Health & Wellness Center

Photo of Vodra Campus Building

Health and Wellness Center

Free services, no appointment needed—NJCU's Health and Wellness Center is as affordable and convenient for registered students as it is helpful and outstanding.

Located in easily accessible Vodra Hall, the Health and Wellness Center offers preventive and primary care services to help NJCU students stay healthy, regardless of insurance. No appointment is necessary; students are seen in the order in which they arrive unless their condition warrants otherwise.

With the utmost compassion, professionalism, and confidentiality, HWC's experienced, highly trained staff provides patients:

  • Care for acute concerns including respiratory illness, sprains and strains, fever, stomach pains, skin rashes, and minor emergencies
  • Assistance with chronic illness
  • Services such as pregnancy testing, blood pressure screening, and weight monitoring

In addition to providing referrals for off-campus specialists and other resources as needed, HWC's full-time registered nurses and part-time physician educate students on ways to improve their personal health and self-advocacy in the future as informed consumers of healthcare services.

 

About Coronavirus:

Here at NJCU, we are carefully tracking the coronavirus.  Since this discovery, NJCU has postponed all trips to China until the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that the virus is no longer a threat. In addition, the University is advising students, faculty or staff who have recently traveled to China on education abroad trips or on vacation for the holiday break to see their primary doctor immediately if they begin to experience flu-like symptoms.



The following information is designed to further inform you regarding the current status by the CDC and other details that may be helpful to you:



What is Coronavirus?


The CDC is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (termed “2019-nCoV”) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which continues to expand. Chinese health officials have reported hundreds of infections with 2019-nCoV in China, including outside of Hubei Province. Infections with 2019-nCoV also are being reported in a growing number of countries internationally, including the United States, where the first 2019-nCoV infection was detected in a traveler returning from Wuhan on January 21, 2020.The 019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus (more specifically, a coronavirus) identified as the cause of an outbreak of respiratory illness first detected in Wuhan, China. Early on, many of the patients in the outbreak in Wuhan, China reportedly had some link to a large seafood and animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. However, a growing number of patients reportedly have not had exposure to animal markets, suggesting person-to-person spread is occurring. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people.  



Symptoms

Patients with confirmed 2019-nCoV infection have reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:



  • Fever

  • Cough
  • 
Shortness of breath



The CDC believes at this time that symptoms of 2019-nCoV may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 after exposure. This is based on what has been seen previously as the incubation period of MERS viruses.



Transmission

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS and SARS.  When person-to-person spread has occurred with MERS and SARS, it is thought to have happened via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread. Spread of SARS and MERS between people has generally occurred between close contacts.

It’s important to note that how easily a virus spreads person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. It’s not clear yet how easily 2019-nCoV spreads from person-to-person. It’s important to know this in order to better understand the risk associated with this virus.



Prevention

There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Right now, 2019-nCoV has not been found to be spreading in the United States, so there are no additional precautions recommended for the general public to take. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Stay home when you are sick.
Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

These are every day habits that can help prevent the spread of several viruses. CDC does have specific guidance for travelers.



Treatment

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for 2019-nCoV infection. People infected with 2019-nCoV should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

Here at NJCU, we are carefully tracking the coronavirus.  Since this discovery, NJCU has postponed all trips to China until the CDC reports that the virus is no longer a threat. In addition, the University has alerted students who have recently traveled to China on education abroad trips or on vacation for the holiday break to see their primary doctor immediately if they begin to experience flu-like symptoms.

Anyone who believes they may have been exposed to 2019-nCoV should contact your healthcare provider immediately.
 

ENTRANCE HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATIONS

The HWC oversees University health requirements for all entering students.

Each NJCU student MUST submit the NJCU Entrance Health Record, which is used to establish a student's medical file and document compliance with state immunization laws. All information supplied is kept confidential and cannot be released to another party without the student's written consent. Students may mail or fax documentation signed by a licensed health care provider, a copy of a signed and authorized school record, or the completed NJCU Immunization form signed and stamped by an authorized health care provider.

Please use this Medical Release form when requesting the release of your medical records from any healthcare provider to NJCU.

Return completed forms to:

New Jersey City University
Health and Wellness Center
2039 Kennedy Blvd. - Vodra 107
Jersey City, NJ 07305

Or fax to 201-200-2011

Download the form: NJCU Entrance Health Record

Contact Us

If you are a registered NJCU student with a health concern or question, stop in at your Health and Wellness Center.

Vodra Hall, Room 107
Phone: 201-200-3456
Fax: 201-200-2011
Email: hwc@njcu.edu

Fall/Spring Semester Hours

Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
Closed Saturday - Sunday

Summer Hours

Monday - Thursday 8:15am - 4:45pm
Closed Friday - Sunday